We've got your back.

We have always got your back, but we can also support the rest of you too.

Osteopaths are trained to treat all parts of the body and are also trained in being able to give advice on maintaining your general well-being. 

At Osteopathy For All all our Osteopaths can treat your back, your knees, your shoulders and your neck etc, I won't go on but you get the picture. We are all also trained to treat children from birth onward.  However, each of us also has an area of specialist interest. 

Pippa has a special interest in treating trauma within the body. Whether this be physical or psychological in origin. Once the body is traumatised it can manifest as tension within the muscles and the other soft tissues of the body which in turn can cause pain or dysfunction (that feeling that you are just a bit off). The importance of the MindBody link has become significantly more recognised across the medical world in the last couple of years.

Louise, as well as treating the practice's equine patients, is fabulous at creating exercise protocols for you to aid you recovery between treatments. Regular exercises accompanied by treatment and lifestyle advice will improve your well being as well as speed up pain reduction. The latest NICE guidelines recommend physical therapy, such as Osteopathy, and exercise as more effective than painkillers for back pain.

Becca has a special interest in the front of the body and its relationship to the back. Visceral Osteopathy encompasses the treatment of the organs as well as the musculoskeletal system. Our organs, such as the gut, are made up of smooth muscle and are supported by our bodies framework by an amazing tissue called fascia. Fascia is a little bit like 'clingfilm'. Ask about it when you are next in, if you are interested.  By influencing the tension in the front of the body it can have a marked effect on the back of the body. 

The beauty of the Osteopathic approach to the body is that there is no specific recipe. We treat each patient as an individual and work with our knowledge and your body's requirements to set you on a pain-free path to well-being.

September Special Offer

Is Osteopathy what your body is crying out for?

 

Have you got pain or stiffness or an injury that won't heal?

Do you have headaches or shoulder pain? 

Arthritis or tennis elbow?

 

We are fully trained to treat all of the above and more...

Why not take advantage of our September special offer and come and see how we can help you?

 

 Check Out our New Patient Offer page for more details

What is...??????

Why do we have question marks in our window?

Well we are sponsoring and supporting the

Nearly Secret Art Sale

in East Hoathly on 16th and 17th September 2017. It will be a fabulous event with lots of great art but you won't know who each piece is by until after the piece has been successfully bid on and won, as the artists will be signing them on the back. 

There will be a list of contributors which will include 2 of our Osteopaths. Both Pippa and our new Osteopath, Becca, will be exhibiting. So why not come along and enjoy the pop up gallery, have a drink or a cuppa, meet our Osteopaths and bid on some really great art.

 

So back to the question marks?

Do you have any questions about Osteopathy? Are you wondering whether it wold be good for you or family? What conditions can it treat? Is it good for babies? Will it help my horse's performance? How does it work? How long will it take?...

If you have any questions then please contact us so we can help answer them for you. 

MRI - what Osteopaths do on their days off!!

So I spent some of Saturday morning having an MRI scan.

 

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is a scanner that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to obtain detailed images of the brain or spine.  A CT or CAT scan (computerised tomography) may be used instead for bone injuries, lung and chest imaging and cancer detection. The Radiographer is responsible for taking the scan and then they are sent to the Radiologist to be assessed and reported on before being sent back to your referring practitioner.

 

 

What I did know about the MRI experience...

I knew that I would have to lie very still for the duration of the scan. It only took about 20 minutes so this wasn't too bad and the lovely staff made me feel very comfortable. I also knew it was going to make a lot of noise.

What I didn't know was that it was going to make a number of different noises - none of which were terribly musical.  I also didn't know that it was going to require me to wear ear plugs as well as headphones and their choice of radio station left quite a lot to be desired. It was a painless, if slightly unnerving and rattly experience.

I won't have the report of the results for a few weeks but hopefully it will show that I have some backbone - literally and figuratively.

 

As Osteopaths we are usually able to get you an MRI scan via your GP if necessary. However, we can also refer you privately if appropriate. We may feel a scan is appropriate if you have a severe acute injury such as a prolapsed disc or if you have a long term chronic pain condition that is not responding to treatment. We pride ourselves on being able to diagnose many different conditions using case history taking, observation and physical examination, but sometimes we need to be able to have a look on the inside. If you have any further questions about scanning let us know. Pippa

 

 

CPD - Continuing Professional Development or Complete Patient Dedication

All Osteopaths have to complete 30 hours of CPD a year.

CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development.

It refers to the process of tracking and documenting the skills, knowledge and experience that you gain both formally and informally as you work, beyond your initial training. It is a record of what you experience learn and then apply.

Osteopaths have to complete a minimum of 15 hours of learning with others within the 30 hours and we have to cover all areas of our professional standards. Communication and Patient Partnership, Knowledge, Skills and Performance, Safety and Quality in Practice, Professionalism. We have to complete this to remain registered with the General Osteopathic Council.

What this means to you?  - Complete Patient Dedication

It means that we are dedicated to providing you with the best possible care that we can. It means we are up to date in our knowledge of all aspects of communication and safe-guarding of our patients. We have information on the latest research and development into the best way to treat the conditions you are struggling with. 

I am off on a course this weekend in Bio-dynamic Osteopathy. It is sure to be very inspiring and I look forward to sharing all my new and revisited knowledge with you next week and beyond. Pippa

We've got your back.

We have always got your back, but we can also support the rest of you too.

Osteopaths are trained to treat all parts of the body and are also trained in being able to give advice on maintaining your general well-being. 

At Osteopathy For All all our Osteopaths can treat your back, your knees, your shoulders and your neck etc, I won't go on but you get the picture. We are all also trained to treat children from birth onward.  However, each of us also has an area of specialist interest. 

Pippa has a special interest in treating trauma within the body. Whether this be physical or psychological in origin. Once the body is traumatised it can manifest as tension within the muscles and the other soft tissues of the body which in turn can cause pain or dysfunction (that feeling that you are just a bit off). The importance of the MindBody link has become significantly more recognised across the medical world in the last couple of years.

Louise, as well as treating the practice's equine patients, is fabulous at creating exercise protocols for you to aid you recovery between treatments. Regular exercises accompanied by treatment and lifestyle advice will improve your well being as well as speed up pain reduction. The latest NICE guidelines recommend physical therapy, such as Osteopathy, and exercise as more effective than painkillers for back pain.

Becca has a special interest in the front of the body and its relationship to the back. Visceral Osteopathy encompasses the treatment of the organs as well as the musculoskeletal system. Our organs, such as the gut, are made up of smooth muscle and are supported by our bodies framework by an amazing tissue called fascia. Fascia is a little bit like 'clingfilm'. Ask about it when you are next in, if you are interested.  By influencing the tension in the front of the body it can have a marked effect on the back of the body. 

The beauty of the Osteopathic approach to the body is that there is no specific recipe. We treat each patient as an individual and work with our knowledge and your body's requirements to set you on a pain-free path to well-being.

September Special Offer

Is Osteopathy what your body is crying out for?

 

Have you got pain or stiffness or an injury that won't heal?

Do you have headaches or shoulder pain? 

Arthritis or tennis elbow?

 

We are fully trained to treat all of the above and more...

Why not take advantage of our September special offer and come and see how we can help you?

 

 Check Out our New Patient Offer page for more details

What is...??????

Why do we have question marks in our window?

Well we are sponsoring and supporting the

Nearly Secret Art Sale

in East Hoathly on 16th and 17th September 2017. It will be a fabulous event with lots of great art but you won't know who each piece is by until after the piece has been successfully bid on and won, as the artists will be signing them on the back. 

There will be a list of contributors which will include 2 of our Osteopaths. Both Pippa and our new Osteopath, Becca, will be exhibiting. So why not come along and enjoy the pop up gallery, have a drink or a cuppa, meet our Osteopaths and bid on some really great art.

 

So back to the question marks?

Do you have any questions about Osteopathy? Are you wondering whether it wold be good for you or family? What conditions can it treat? Is it good for babies? Will it help my horse's performance? How does it work? How long will it take?...

If you have any questions then please contact us so we can help answer them for you. 

MRI - what Osteopaths do on their days off!!

So I spent some of Saturday morning having an MRI scan.

 

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is a scanner that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to obtain detailed images of the brain or spine.  A CT or CAT scan (computerised tomography) may be used instead for bone injuries, lung and chest imaging and cancer detection. The Radiographer is responsible for taking the scan and then they are sent to the Radiologist to be assessed and reported on before being sent back to your referring practitioner.

 

 

What I did know about the MRI experience...

I knew that I would have to lie very still for the duration of the scan. It only took about 20 minutes so this wasn't too bad and the lovely staff made me feel very comfortable. I also knew it was going to make a lot of noise.

What I didn't know was that it was going to make a number of different noises - none of which were terribly musical.  I also didn't know that it was going to require me to wear ear plugs as well as headphones and their choice of radio station left quite a lot to be desired. It was a painless, if slightly unnerving and rattly experience.

I won't have the report of the results for a few weeks but hopefully it will show that I have some backbone - literally and figuratively.

 

As Osteopaths we are usually able to get you an MRI scan via your GP if necessary. However, we can also refer you privately if appropriate. We may feel a scan is appropriate if you have a severe acute injury such as a prolapsed disc or if you have a long term chronic pain condition that is not responding to treatment. We pride ourselves on being able to diagnose many different conditions using case history taking, observation and physical examination, but sometimes we need to be able to have a look on the inside. If you have any further questions about scanning let us know. Pippa

 

 

CPD - Continuing Professional Development or Complete Patient Dedication

All Osteopaths have to complete 30 hours of CPD a year.

CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development.

It refers to the process of tracking and documenting the skills, knowledge and experience that you gain both formally and informally as you work, beyond your initial training. It is a record of what you experience learn and then apply.

Osteopaths have to complete a minimum of 15 hours of learning with others within the 30 hours and we have to cover all areas of our professional standards. Communication and Patient Partnership, Knowledge, Skills and Performance, Safety and Quality in Practice, Professionalism. We have to complete this to remain registered with the General Osteopathic Council.

What this means to you?  - Complete Patient Dedication

It means that we are dedicated to providing you with the best possible care that we can. It means we are up to date in our knowledge of all aspects of communication and safe-guarding of our patients. We have information on the latest research and development into the best way to treat the conditions you are struggling with. 

I am off on a course this weekend in Bio-dynamic Osteopathy. It is sure to be very inspiring and I look forward to sharing all my new and revisited knowledge with you next week and beyond. Pippa

Swim, Dance, Garden or Sing your pain away...

This blog title isn't meant to sound flippant. As a chronic pain/fatigue sufferer I really know what it is like to be in so much pain, so much of the time, that you never think that you will be able to do anything again, let alone something you used to love. It feels overwhelming and unmanageable. 

However, if you can find something that you love and manage to do it even a couple of times a week, or every day for a short time it will help your body to feel better and reduce your pain. When we are more relaxed and happy our Cortisol (the stress hormone) levels reduce and this in turn can help to reduce our pain.

When my pain was really bad and my energy levels were really low I, initially, survived on a diet of Netflix. It meant I rested and was distracted from the pain. If that is all you can manage and you enjoy films and box sets it is well worth the subscription. 

But what makes you tick...

I sing...some of you may have seen The Singing Osteopath video that was our Friday Funny last week on our Facebook page. There is a link below for anyone who missed it . Singing is something that I could do that didn't cause me too much discomfort or use up too much energy and the benefits of the joy it brings are huge. It sets me up for the week.

What brings you joy? 

Walk...to the end of the garden and back...Dance...even if it is just on the spot in your kitchen.

With spring coming, if you are a passionate gardener, but are frustrated because you cannot get stuck in due to pain and stiffness, could you plant up some pots and put them outside the window to enjoy whilst you are resting. If someone can help you by putting everything on a table so you don't need to bend to garden you may still find pleasure in it. If you are not quite up to this, even sitting out in the sun at midday for 10 minutes will help elevate your vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency can cause pain and stiffness and is very common in Britain today in all area of the population.

As I started to improve I was able to start swimming and then walking my dogs again. As we move our bodies not only does it allow our muscles to stretch but it also improves the blood supply and the lymphatic drainage which in turn boosts the health of our bodies so that gradually we start to recover. It can be a long process but each baby step we take is worth it. 

At Osteopathy For All we are also here to help support your body and to help get it moving.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCgKo04Q9Jc

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We don't treat conditions, we treat people...

We treat people...

I was updating the website this week and was writing a section about what osteopaths treat. We are allowed, by the advertising standards agency, to say we treat a number of conditions. These include back pain, tennis elbow and osteoarthritis, to name just a few.

However, what we really treat is people...big people(adults) and small people (children). In our case we also treat their horses, but I will save that for another day.

What is important is the whole person and the stresses and strains that have led them to the osteopath. Everybody's story is different and we, as osteopaths, have the greatest luxury of being able to spend time finding out our patient's story. Rarely are they not many chapters. Some people have just strained something, but it is rarely in isolation. It may be related to an occupational postural problem or to ongoing stress causing a raised tension in the tissues that has predisposed them to injury. It may be that they had a previous injury or illness that has taken its toll on the body and this is just the final insult.

What always amazes me still, even after over 20 years in practice, is how one person can have a impact, physical or emotional, and respond so differently to another individual in a similar situation. Some people just sail through, whilst others can have a minor injury that rocks their world. That is why we treat people, not conditions.

The Teenage Brain....

I am looking forward to  a magical mystery tour next weekend....The Teenage Brain. I will be on a course exploring all aspects of the teenage brain, from the neurological development to social anxiety disorders and how to support and treat them osteopathically. Good stuff, can't wait. Pippa

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Helping Yourself


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'Do Osteopaths have any training?'

'Do Osteopaths have any training?' was something I read recently on Facebook. It had been asked when an osteopath had asked to put some leaflets out in a psychologists practice.

 

Yes, we do. 

 

In the UK Osteopaths complete a 4 year full time course or a 5 year part time course which results in a BSc Hons, a BOst or BOstMed or a masters degree MOst. Those of us who qualified before 1995 have a DO. This is a Diploma in Osteopathy in the UK and a Doctor of Osteopathy in the USA. In the USA, DO's are medical practitioners. However, what many people don't know about Osteopathic training in the UK is that it covers many aspects of medicine in the training.

Osteopathic training not only includes high levels of anatomy , physiology, bio-mechanics, osteopathic principles and technique it also includes a full understanding of the body from a medical prospective. We learn, in depth, for instance, about the cardiovascular system, the gastrointestinal system, the endocrine system as well as the musculoskeletal system. We have courses in neurology, pathology, pharmacology, nutrition, radiology and orthopaedics as well as paediatrics. We also complete a 1000 hours of clinical training prior to graduating.

 

Why, you might ask? Well, if a patient comes into our clinic and pain in their back we need to know what is the cause of that pain and whether it is safe to treat. Is it a muscle, is it a nerve, is it a referred pain from a kidney? Our medical knowledge helps us to take a full case history, to ask to right questions to therefore perform the correct examination to make a diagnosis. Sometimes the most important knowledge is when not to treat the patient and when to refer them back to their GP for further examination and tests.

 

We have to complete Continuing Professional Development (CPD) each year encompassing the Osteopathic Professional Standards to ensure we are up to date and able to provide the best care to our patients.

 

From the General Osteopathic Council's website:

The title 'osteopath' is protected by law (Protection of title) and you have to be registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) to practise in the UK, Isle of Man and Gibraltar. It is a criminal offence, liable to prosecution, for anyone to claim explicitly or by implication to be any kind of osteopath unless they are on the GOsC Register. In order to be registered, you must have completed a course of training that is recognised by the GOsC.

 

#OsteopathyWorks

www.osteopathyforall.co.uk

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